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Representing WA State Families For Over 20 Years!
Call Today So We Can Help
Se Habla Español
253-272-5653

Tag Archives: property division

Keeping Personal and Business Assets Separate Can Help Prevent a Messy Divorce

One of the most contentious issues in divorce is the division of marital assets. This can become even more complicated if one or both of the spouses has an ownership stake in a business. While several factors can affect whether a spouse is entitled to receive assets from a business owned by the other, there […]

Your Remedies if You Suspect Your Spouse is Hiding Assets During Divorce

Washington is a community property state, which means that marital property is generally split 50/50 during a divorce. An important part of this equal division is gaining a complete financial picture of the assets and debts of both spouses. Failing to fully and honestly disclose finances during divorce proceedings is illegal but more common than […]

Does Marital Fault Affect Property Division or Child Custody?

Washington is a no-fault state, where the only ground for divorce is the irretrievable breakdown of a marriage. Traditional grounds like adultery, cruelty and desertion have been abolished. Yet the bad behavior of one or both of the spouses can affect a divorce in other ways — namely, regarding property division and parenting rights. Property […]

How Does Community Property Division Work in Washington?

Under Washington law, debts or assets acquired during the course of a marriage are generally deemed community property that is subject to equal division upon divorce. Property acquired prior to marriage is usually exempt from that division. However, Washington differs from other community property states in that it allows a divorce court to look at […]

How Can Separate Property Best Be Protected in a Divorce?

A recent Bank of America survey shows that 28 percent of married millennials keep their finances separate, compared with 11 percent of Gen Xers and 13 percent of baby boomers. Why the dramatic increase? Perhaps millennials were sobered by living through the hardships caused by the Great Recession. Or they may be children of divorce […]